Frank Calio's Blog (www.frankcalio.com)

Current events, political, local, nationally

REUBLICAN VOTERS CHANGE OVER TO VOTE FOR SANDERS

Many Republicans changed their registration in the Iowa primary to vote for Bernie Sanders, the weakest of the two Democrats to almost give him an upset win in Iowa but not out of love or loyalty for him.

This how it works. In Delaware you can only vote in a primary you are registered with, Democrats voters for Democrats, Republicans for Republicans; Independents can’t vote for either.

In Iowa as late as Election Day you could change your registration.  I have a friend who formerly worked and lived in Delaware, now works and resides in Iowa. She worked the election yesterday.

On her FB page she stated many Republicans and Independents were changing their party affrication to Democrat to support Sanders not really for him but against Hillary Clinton.

Republicans don’t want Hillary Clinton as their opponent in the November Election. So you vote for Sanders who cannot win against any of the three top Republicans and hope he wins the delegates and goes on to be the Presidential nominee. Take away those votes and Hillary would have won by a larger margin. 

It’s an old political trick which has been used many times. And it almost worked. A loss would have been a disaster for the Clinton campaign.

A Sanders win would have given him great momentum in the next state New Hampshire where he trails Clinton by a large margin. A win yesterday would have meant $$$$ to his campaign.

 

MARKELL THROWING GOOD MONEY AFTER BAD

Delaware’s Governor Jack Markell unveiled his last budget yesterday, again putting millions in his budget for education.

Everyone knows the value of an education, especially in today’s competitive global market.

But with many schools in Delaware failing to produce the test scores mandated by the Department of Education pumping in more money into a failing system that is not working is a waste.

The problem stems with DOE; the governor doesn’t have the courage to cut the fat from that group and reorganize the department and change the method of teaching our kids. He has tried to be the education leader and I appreciate his dedication toward that goal.

But he has had seven years to turn around he system and his efforts have failed.

His budget puts a lot of money into early education; a good idea to begin training our younger generation. But if you don’t have the right tools to teach or the correct program, you are getting our young kids off to a bad start.

I’m glad to see money for teacher raises, but again that is not the answer. Any good teacher will tell you they are not in this game for money but to make a difference in the lives of children. Money greases the wheel, but when you are dissatisfied you are not providing the kids the learning skills they need to succeed in life; it’s frustrating.

 

TRUMP AND PRESS GUTLESS

Can you imagine Donald Trump as President standing up to foreign leaders who oppose his policies when he can’t even stand up to questions from a female reporter?

The Don is gutless; he has always had it his way and that doesn’t happen in politics especially as President.

Today the press is praising his move to boycott the recent debate as having courage. Bull Shit. In my early days as a journalist reporters would have torn him a new butt. He screwed the American public by not being available to answer questions voters need to know of their next President.

Instead he choose to use our Veterans as a pawn to avoid the debate.

Trump has no balls, today’s media has no balls.

the hard questions the voters need to know of their next president.

CLEAN UP BEGINS FROM SNOW STORM

Sussex County EOC scales back operations as major winter storm begins to exit region

 

Last bands of snow falling across county; coastal flooding continues, but PM tidal levels lower than Saturday morning values

 

FOR IMMEDIATE                                                                                2300 Hours, Saturday

RELEASE                                                                                                               Jan. 23, 2016

 

As the ill effects of a major winter storm begin to lessen with the system’s slow departure off the East Coast, the Sussex County Emergency Operations Center will scale back operations during the overnight hours into Sunday morning, with a skeleton crew monitoring conditions, particularly flooding in coastal areas.

 

Sussex County EOC Director Joseph L. Thomas said the slowdown in the weather, along with the lessening of damage reports and calls for service, is a perfect opportunity to give staff time to rest so the task of cleaning up and assessing damage can begin Sunday.

 

“It has been relatively quiet this evening as we’ve gone through the latest round of high-tide cycles. Thankfully, those do not appear to have been as high as the near-record flooding we saw this morning in places along the Atlantic coastline and in the Inland Bays,” Mr. Thomas said. “Things should begin to gradually improve in the hours ahead, and then everyone can get to work in the morning assessing the damage and cleaning up from what is sure to be a storm remembered for years to come.”

 

A coastal flood warning remains in effect for Sussex County through noon Sunday. Moderate to major tidal flooding that had been observed in many low-lying communities earlier Saturday is expected to diminish over the next 18 to 24 hours, as the storm pulls away from the region and winds continue their shift from the northeast to the north and northwest. The wind shift will help to push out to sea water that has piled up in coastal areas.

 

A state of emergency and a Level 1 driving advisory for Sussex County remain in effect; while travel is not prohibited, motorists are encouraged to avoid travel if at all possible, particularly during the overnight hours, as several roads in the county remain closed either due to flooding or debris.

 

Meantime, the county’s designated shelter during the storm, Sussex Central High School, is scheduled to close at 11 p.m. Saturday. Volunteers with the American Red Cross of the Delmarva Peninsula are working with the one individual who remained at the shelter to find temporary housing following relocation from the Oak Orchard-Riverdale community earlier in the day.

 

The public is reminded to stay tuned to local television and radio stations, as well as the Sussex County website at www.sussexcountyde.gov, for updated information. The public also should monitor the National Weather Service, at www.weather.gov/phi for the latest forecasts.

 

Meantime, Sussex County offers a variety of social media outlets, which are a great resource for up-to-date storm information. Please follow along at: www.facebook.com/SussexCountyDE, www.facebook.com/SussexCountyEOC, and www.facebook.com/SussexCountyEMS on Facebook; and www.twitter.com/sussexde_govt, www.twitter.com/SussexCtyDE_EOC, and www.twitter.com/SussexCoDE_EMS on Twitter.

 

Anyone with non-emergency questions or in need of additional information can call the Sussex County EOC’s storm information hotline at (302) 856-7366.

FLOODING CAUSING MAJOR DAMAGE

Follow along on Facebook @ www.facebook.com/SussexCountyDE and on Twitter @ www.twitter.com/sussexde_govt

 

Near-historic flooding, high winds lashing Sussex County

 

Winter storm, coastal flood, high wind warnings remain in effect; Sussex County EOC announces opening of shelter

 

FOR IMMEDIATE                                                                                1200 Hours, Saturday

RELEASE                                                                                                               Jan. 23, 2016

 

Potentially record-breaking coastal flooding, near-hurricane force winds and a mixture of pelting snow, sleet and rain are thrashing parts of Sussex County this Saturday from the season’s first major winter storm, which threatens to continue its assault on the East Coast before slowly subsiding in the next 18 hours.

 

A winter storm warning, coastal flood warning, and high wind warning remain in effect for Sussex County through Sunday morning, Jan. 24. Total snowfall amounts of 2 to 12 inches, from southeast to northwest, are possible, as well as tidal flooding in coastal areas running more than 4 feet above normal. Meantime, winds of 50 mph, with gusts to hurricane-force of 74 mph, are possible into Saturday night.

 

A state of emergency remains in effect statewide. At this time, no evacuations have been ordered. Gov. Jack Markell has kept in place the Level 1 driving advisory for Sussex County; motorists are asked to avoid travel if at all possible.

 

As expected, the major effects of this nor’easter in Sussex County have been significant flooding – a near-record level of 9.2 feet at Lewes at the 8 a.m. high tide, just shy of the 9.22-foot record set in the historic March 1962 nor’easter. Numerous dune breaches have occurred along the Atlantic coast, forcing the closure of SR 1 south of Dewey Beach; low-lying communities around the Inland Bays are experiencing significant flooding; and nearly 8,000 Delaware Electric Cooperative and Delmarva Power customers are without power throughout the county, largely due to downed trees and power lines.

 

Due to the deteriorating conditions and the storm’s effects, Sussex County and Delaware emergency planners have designated one shelter facility for any residents in critical need. The designated shelter, which opens at 12 p.m. Saturday, is:

 

Sussex Central High School

26026 Patriots Way

Georgetown, DE

(Pets accepted)

 

Those visiting the shelter should remember to take adequate clothing, medications, sleeping materials, and food for themselves, their families and/or their pets (where accepted). Shelters will be staffed by the American Red Cross of the Delmarva Peninsula (www.redcrossdelmarva.org). Anyone needing assistance relocating to the shelter should contact the Sussex County Emergency Operations Center’s storm hotline at (302) 856-7366.

 

Officials at the Sussex County EOC, which activated at 6 a.m. Saturday, continue to monitor the storm and are in constant contact with state emergency planners, various agencies and forecasters for the latest information. Meantime, the Delaware National Guard has pre-positioned equipment, including heavy duty vehicles, to assist in any storm-related issues.

 

The public is reminded to stay tuned to local television and radio stations, as well as the Sussex County website at www.sussexcountyde.gov, for updated information. The public also should monitor the National Weather Service, at www.weather.gov/phi for the latest forecasts.

 

Meantime, Sussex County offers a variety of social media outlets, which are a great resource for up-to-date storm information. Please follow along at: www.facebook.com/SussexCountyDE, www.facebook.com/SussexCountyEOC, and www.facebook.com/SussexCountyEMS on Facebook; and www.twitter.com/sussexde_govt, www.twitter.com/SussexCtyDE_EOC, and www.twitter.com/SussexCoDE_EMS on Twitter.

 

Anyone with non-emergency

HEY, IT’S SNOWING OUTSIDE

Snowfall begins across Sussex County

 

Winter storm, coastal flood, high wind warnings in effect; storm could produce up to 9 inches of snow, 50 mph winds, swollen tides

 

FOR IMMEDIATE                                                                                    1730 Hours, Friday

RELEASE                                                                                                               Jan. 22, 2016

 

The first flakes of a major winter storm are falling across Sussex County, the early signs of what could be days of heavy precipitation – snow, sleet and rain – as well as significant coastal flooding and high winds, all of which combined could stall travel, cut off communities and leave homes in the dark.

 

The National Weather Service in Mt. Holly, N.J., has issued a winter storm warning for Sussex County through Sunday morning, Jan. 24, for 4 to 9 inches of snow. In coastal areas, lesser amounts are expected as warmer air from the Atlantic Ocean mixes in, while inland locations to the northwest could see totals approach a foot if an expected changeover to rain is limited. A coastal flood warning and high wind warning are also in effect for the county.

 

Delaware Gov. Jack Markell has issued a state of emergency, effective immediately, and urged motorists to avoid travel if at all possible.

 

While snow is a concern with any winter storm, the major effects of this nor’easter could be prolonged 50 mph northeasterly winds and moderate to severe coastal flooding along the beaches and Inland Bays, where tides could run as much as 4 feet above normal. The storm’s expected strength and slow track, along with a full moon this weekend, are expected to push water into low-lying communities through at least Sunday evening, forecasters predict.

 

Sussex County will activate its Emergency Operations Center at 6 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 23, with staff monitoring the storm and conditions, and responding to any issues, as needed. County officials continue to monitor the developing storm and are in contact with state emergency planners and forecasters for the latest information. Meantime, the Delaware National Guard has pre-positioned equipment, including heavy duty vehicles, to assist in any storm-related issues.

 

No evacuations have been ordered, and no shelters have been designated at this time. However, residents in vulnerable, flood-prone areas should move to higher ground, if necessary.

 

“Hopefully, the public has heeded the warnings and made the necessary preparations. Now we wait to see what unfolds,” Sussex County EOC Director Joseph L. Thomas said. “My greatest concern continues to be flooding in our coastal communities, particularly during the times of high tide at 8 o’clock Saturday morning and again Saturday night. This could rank up there with some of the historic nor’easters of the past, including the 1992 and 1998 storms, when we had flooding that lasted several days.”

 

“The public should continue to monitor the forecasts, stay off the roads and sit this one out,” Mr. Thomas said. “It could be a messy couple of days.”

 

In addition to flooding, power outages could be another problem with downed trees and lines caused by strong, gusty winds. Forecasters expect northeasterly winds to whip along the coast and inland, with gusts possibly reaching 50 to 60 mph, throughout Saturday before lessening early Sunday morning.

 

For updates, stay tuned to local television and radio stations, as well as the Sussex County website at www.sussexcountyde.gov. The public also should monitor the National Weather Service, at www.weather.gov/phi for the latest forecasts.

 

Meantime, Sussex County offers a variety of social media outlets, which are a great resource for up-to-date storm information. Please follow along at: www.facebook.com/SussexCountyDE, www.facebook.com/SussexCountyEOC, and www.facebook.com/SussexCountyEMS on Facebook; and www.twitter.com/sussexde_govt, www.twitter.com/SussexCtyDE_EOC, and www.twitter.com/SussexCoDE_EMS on Twitter.

 

Beginning at 6 a.m. Saturday, anyone with non-emergency questions or in need of additional information can call the Sussex County EOC’s storm information hotline at (302) 856-7366.

###

Media calls should be directed to EOC spokeswoman Debra Jones at (302) 855-7801 or Sussex County Communications Director Chip Guy at (302) 858-0505.

CHINA ECONOMY TO LEAD TO ANOTHER RECESSION

Economist predict the next global recession is likely to be made in China. We have already in this country seen the reaction from China’s imploding stock market which began 3 1/2 hours on the first trading day of the year in the Chinese stock market.
Our country is no longer the world power other countries depend on. During the ’80s this country had the strongest economy in the world. Today 40% of other countries depend upon the economy of China.
Although our economy has strengthened for the past seven years, the recovery has been weak due to low wages, resulting in lower consumer spending. It is estimated 70% of this country’s economy is dependent upon our consumer spending. My logic has always been, pay high wages, and it will come back to the companies paying those wages.
You can’t grow an economy with low paying, part-time, no benefit jobs, plain and simple. Nor can we grow with jobs going overseas and watch U.S. corporations get fat resulting in more cash reserves.
In case you haven’t noticed watching Wall Street, as a result of China’s economy we are heading for another recession; this one worse than the last Great Recession we just came out of because our economy has not recovered from that recession.
As long as companies want to be greedy we are in for a bad time.

STATE LOWERS CORPORATE TAX

Delaware legislators fearful of losing more corporations after DuPont merged with Dow Chemical and the threat of DuPont pulling out of Delaware has prompted a corporate tax cut costing Delaware taxpayers $9 million dollars a year pushing Delaware’s deficit upward to nearly $30 million.

Wonderful; wonder when our tax cut is coming?

ARRESTED PERSON NOT A MEMBER OF PTO

For clarification the person arrested for taking money belonging to the Parent’s Teachers Organization better known as the PTA was not a member nor associated with that organization. We are not at liberty to state how the money was taken from that organization.

The same person is alleged to have absconded with money from the local teachers union. No arrest has been made by that group pending an audit.

More information at this site as soon as we receive it.  

ARREST MADE IN PTO FUNDS NONE BY LEA

“An arrest has been made in connection with the theft of the PTO (Parent Teacher Organization) funds. The suspect has been placed on unpaid leave.  The District has also reported the alleged theft of the LEA (teachers union) funds, though no arrest has been made at this time by the union.”

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