DISCLOSURE LAW DOESN’T GO FAR ENOUGH

Legislation introduced for the upcoming legislation session in Dover would require state officials to disclose whether a family member works for state government, a public school, university or an agency that receives tax dollars.

In the past there have been incidents where money was funneled into nonprofits where legislators had family members drawing large salaries; this bill is a good start, but not far-reaching enough.

Attempts at two other bills I consider more important have failed to get out of committee. One is where a legislator who draws an annual salary of over $50,000 per year, plus mileage, an expense account, all the free meals they can get from lobbyists and other perks, can hold another state job, usually one paying a higher salary than they draw as a legislator. How can they claim being a legislator is a full-time job if they hold a full-time job?

The argument for double dipping, and a poor one, that the experience these legislators have with their state job helps other members of the General Assembly by having these legislators working in government??

The next bill that has sunk whenever it is brought up is to disallow anyone who serves in the legislature not to be able to have a lobbyist position when they leave. This would assure a legislator doesn’t favor a particular company while serving the public, and then reap the rewards of a position after they leave.

Look at the officers in the Pentagon allowing huge over runs with government contracts; when they retire they are hired by these companies at large salaries as ‘consultants’ another word for “Thank you”.

We’ll probably never see either of these bills pass; why cut off your nose to spite your face? It’s only tax payers money we’re dealing with here.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “DISCLOSURE LAW DOESN’T GO FAR ENOUGH

  1. it would be interesting to see what family members of elected officials are employed by the state or any other govt entity and coorelate hire dates with when folks where in office. Should be all public info so should be a revealling exercise. i dont understand why you keep saying none of this can be changed? why cant we ask our politicians to play by all the rules the rest of us follow?

  2. I guess I have witnessed too much good legislation, needed, tabled because of special interests and poor legislation sail through because of the same groups. I have worked closely with legislators since I was 24 years of age, my first trip to Dover, everything i learned in my history books went out the window. The final straw was my last job in Elections and I oversaw campaign finance and where the money comes in.
    Many reasons why when I say you can’t change it, I base it on raw experience not a fairy tale. Banks don’t get legislation passed asking a nice guy like you to speak to the legislators; they send a $100,000+ a year lobbyists with a fat expense account to get your legislation passed. Can you name anything I’ve told you at our luncheons that didn’t go the way I said it would?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s